Bilateral in Shanghai between Italia and China

Bilateral in Shanghai between Italia and China

Yao Jin
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"Current economic and geopolitical challenges in the energy sector: looking for a cooperation between Italy and China" is the title of a meeting promoted by the LUISS University which aims to deepen the mutual understanding of the 2 countries on energy, analyzing possible cooperation prospects

The correlation between economic development and the energy industry, development of the Chinese and European markets and cooperation between China and Italy within the scope of key energy topics. These are some of the themes of the conference entitled "Current economic and geopolitical challenges in the energy sector: looking for a cooperation between Italy and China‘, which is taking place at Shanghai-La Pudong Hotel in Shanghai, organized by the LUISS Guido Carli University in Rome. The event will be attended by, among others, Emma Marcegaglia, as Chair of the LUISS University, Massimo Egidi, Rector of the same university, Ettore Sequi, Ambassador of Italy to China, and Stefano Beltrame, Consul General of Italy in Shanghai. “Almost an energy bilateral between Italy and China‘, as defined by Michele Geraci, economist and director of the China Economic Research Program at Nottingham University Business School China, who is also one of the event organizers.

An opportunity to deepen a mutual understanding

During the 3 discussion workshops, all of the main aspects of the energy industry will be touched upon, from general geopolitical topics - including Central Asia, the Mediterranean and the Silk Road - to China’s economic situation - starting from the latest news resulting from the 2 sessions underway in recent days of the National Assembly of the People and the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference - to the role of finance in Chinese energy. The event represents an opportunity, explained Geraci, to “compare the 2 visions - that of China and that of Europe - in order to have a comprehensive picture on all issues. I think that this is the strong point of the conference.‘ The goal, concluded the economist, is that “the Chinese may learn a little more about Italy and Italians a little more about China and that perhaps the event may, for both countries, be an opportunity to look with more interest into each other’s markets. A market like that of China, which we know is heavily regulated, and which promotes the exchange of ideas and knowledge, but still limits investments and joint venture activities.‘