Europe discusses its energy future in Tallinn

Europe discusses its energy future in Tallinn

Editorial Staff
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During an informal union of the Energy Ministers of the nations of the European Union hosted by Estonia, current rotating president of the EU, there was much discussion of the hoped-for creation of the Energy Union and the development of a single energy market, sustained by the project for development and interconnectivity between the continent's main infrastructures

The crucial factor in a rational and efficient use of energy resources in a European dimension is the achievement of the hoped-for Energy Union, together with the goal of setting up a single energy market. This horizon, along with numerous other aspects connected with the supply and distribution of energy resources, has been at the heart of the discussions of the EU’s Energy Ministers, gathered in Tallinn, capital of Estonia, the nation currently acting as rotating president of the EU.

The development of a new kind of electricity market is one of the main priorities of the Estonian presidency in terms of energy policy. This is why the heads of the departments handling energy resources and the creation of new infrastructure will be encouraged to reach an agreement concerning the main points of this project: in order to simplify the progress of the negotiations within the European Council. The discussions during this informal gathering are taking place within a program articulated in three sessions where the ministers are able to explore and develop ideas on the main energy-related issues. The same framework will play host to a joint session between Energy and Transport Ministers, in order to examine Europe’s infrastructural development plan up to 2020, together with the project on a new interconnective network joining energy facilities in different countries, necessary for the Energy Union.

In the course of the gathering, the EU commissioner for Energy, Miguel Arias Canete, and Estonia’s Minister for Economic Affairs and Infrastructure, Kadri Simson, signed the Tallinn e-Energy Declaration: this formalizes the intention of EU nations to improve cooperation between the public sector and major energy companies, in order to develop more sustainable energy production models, more efficient networks and to establish more consumer-friendly prices.