In Sweden the ultra-right party advances but does not break through

In Sweden the ultra-right party advances but does not break through

Editorial staff
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The political elections in the Scandinavian country attest the holding of the left coalition that has ruled in the last 4 years, despite the decisive decline of the Social Democrats, and confirm the advance of Sweden Democratic, the right wing movement openly xenophobic

An unresolved result. The outcome of the Swedish general elections could be summarized this way as they saw the confirmation, albeit by measure, of the left coalition that has led the Stockholm government for four years, but also the substantial advance of the right led by Jimmie Akesson. The dreaded upsurge of the populist and xenophobic movement did not occur, but the result obtained, which touches 18% of the votes, raises serious doubts about the formation of a new government in a short time and that, however, does not include the new ultra-right party that gains 62 seats in the Swedish royal parliament. The center-left government block, led by the Social Democratic premier and former metalworking trade unionist Stefan Löfvén, reaches 40.6 percent. It remains first but the Social Democrats themselves, falling to 28.3 percent, collect the worst electoral result of their history since 1908, a vote that will nevertheless guarantee them an important weight in the next government. Little less, the four "bourgeois" parties get that is Nya Moderaterna, Center party, Liberals and Christian Democrats with 40.3 percent, with the moderates confirm the second party with 19.7% (-3.5%). The small parties rise: the former communists (Vänsterpartiet) reach 7.9% (+ 2.2%), the Center Party 8.7% and the Christian Democrats 6.4%. By calculating the seats in the new Riksdag, this means 144 seats to the outgoing government and 143 to historical oppositions that so far had not failed to lend their external support to some priority political chapters, such as the finance law. Sweden Democratic, by the voice of Akesson, expressed its satisfaction. "Our result is a signal to all", he underlines immediately after the electoral results have spread. Now it will be necessary to see if and when, given the political composition that emerged from the polls, Sweden will be able to see the birth of the new government. Given the premise the times are expected to be very long.