New oilfield discovered in Norway

New oilfield discovered in Norway

Editorial Staff
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Perforated at sea, at a depth of 2,700 metres, by the company Engie E&P Norge, it may be able to produce up to 1.3 million barrels a day

The Norwegian oil directorate has announced the discovery of a new oilfield, six kilometres north east of the Gjoa basin. The site was identified by the company Engie E&P Norge, and was bored by the semi-submersible Transocean Artic. During the operations, first a 50-metre gas column and then another 60 metres of oil were discovered, in the Agat geological formation. The oilfield was perforated at a depth of 2,702 metres, the boring reaching the Asgard formation, which dates back to the late Cretaceous period. According to that reported by the Directorate, this basin will have a 1.3-million-metre-cubed-a-day capacity.

One of the companies which has brought the greatest innovation to Norway is Eni, which over the past months has developed the Goliat plant, the biggest and most sophisticated cylindric Floating Production Storage and Offloading Unit (FPSO) in the world - Sevan 1000 - built in the Hyundai worksite in Ulsan, Korea, 85 kilometres north west of Hammerfest. The plant will produce near 100,000 barrels a day in an oilfield with reserves estimated at 180 million barrels of oil. Currently Norway produces an average of 1.8 million barrels of oil every day.
According to the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate, Norway is a key country in terms of natural gas production, with reserves which would total 1.8 metres cubed. This places the Scandinavian country at third place as regards international exportations. Production has more than doubled over fifteen years, passing from 55 billion metres cubed produced in 2000 to over 115 produced in 2015.