North Korea: The U.S. demands a U.N. oil embargo, China pushes for diplomacy

North Korea: The U.S. demands a U.N. oil embargo, China pushes for diplomacy

Editorial Staff
Share
Divergent positions pending the United Nations resolution expected to be approved on September 11. An embargo on crude supplies would bring Pyongyang to its knees

Pending the U.N. resolution expected to be approved on Monday, September 11, the positions taken by the various countries involved in the issue of North Korea - in the firing line after last Sunday's nuclear test - are becoming increasingly clear. At one end is the United States, pushing for a hard line. In a draft resolution submitted to the U.N., Washington is taking the lead in demanding an oil embargo against Pyongyang, a measure that would involve Beijing, a reluctant ally but which still remains North Korea's main goods supplier. At the other end, for obvious reasons, is China, which has reiterated, with Germany's support, the need for new and tougher sanctions. In a telephone conversation, the German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Chinese President Xi Jinping, expressed their deep concern about the current situation in North Korea. At the same time, they said it was important to seek dialogue in order to reach a peaceful resolution of the crisis. It is thus unclear whether China will support the United States resolution pushing for cutting off oil supplies, a measure that would bring Pyongyang to its knees. In addition to speaking with U.S. President Donald Trump and German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Chinese President Xi Jinping also had a telephone conversation with French president Emmanuel Macron to discuss the North Korean nuclear issue.