Japan reconfirms Abe and amends its constitution

Japan reconfirms Abe and amends its constitution

Editorial Staff
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Having scored a positive result at the last elections, the outgoing prime minister, now on his third mandate, is preparing to amend the law that requires the army to restrict itself to self-defense, in order to respond effectively to threats from North Korea

Landslide victory for outgoing prime minister Shinzo Abe in the Japanese elections. Thanks to a higher turnout (53.7%) than in 2014, the results have given the Liberal Democratic party members, together with their allies from Komeito, a substantial majority (310 out of 465 seats), allowing them to proceed with amending the constitution, as predicted by Abe during the election campaign, meaning that the Japanese army will be able to defend the country more effectively, particularly in light of the increasingly pressing threats from Pyongyang. Around fifty seats in the Japanese Lower House will be assigned both to the Constitutional Democratic Party of Yukio Edano, which emerged from the dissolution of the Democrats, and the Party of Hope set up by Tokyo governor Yuriko Koike, who rose through the ranks of the prime minister's formation and is now his greatest rival. At 63, Shinzo Abe is on his third mandate, and is preparing to welcome a visit by President Donald Trump, who is departing on a 14-day round of official visits to Asia, with Tokyo as his first stop.