Solar and wind driving green growth

Solar and wind driving green growth

Editorial Staff
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General Motors aims for its offices to be 100% fuelled by renewables within 2050

Solar and wind power drive the growth of renewables throughout the world. According to the World Energy Council report. Specifically, solar has grown by 50% a year over the past ten years, asserting itself as a solution for the world's rural areas, where "green" energy is considered an innovation capable of driving the development of poor areas. Furthermore, on a global level, renewable energy now counts for 30% of the world installed capacity (equal to 23% of energy produced), with a constant increase in terms of both investments and plants. Even historic "oil nations" such as Saudi Arabia have begun to diversify their energy package, building solar and wind farms. The same is occurring in coastal areas flanked by oil rigs for decades, like the North Sea, where there are several offshore wind farms, now considered an alternative to seeking new oil basins, which is costly and not very profitable. Just think: from a total of 842 GW worldwide in 2004, we reached 1,965 GW in 2015. The Paris COP21 agreement decisively encouraged the development of "renewables" uniting the world's big players around the matters of reducing emissions and developing alternative technologies.

Even large companies like General Motors, one of the world's main vehicle producers, are converting to green. GM CEO, Mary Barra, is aiming for the company's 350 offices in the 59 countries it operates in to be 100% fuelled by renewable energy by 2050. GM currently saves around 5 million dollars by using green energy and aims to cover the whole of the current 9 terawatts/hour through renewable sources.