The Paris climate agreement enters into force. Next stage: Marrakesh

The Paris climate agreement enters into force. Next stage: Marrakesh

Emilio Fabio Torsello
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COP22 will aim at strengthening the commitments made by the single States. While the International Meteorological Organization denounces record levels in emissions reached in 2015

The climate agreement signed in Paris enters into full force today. The result of complex and often critical international negotiations, certainly unique to human history, it represents a turning point in the behaviour of mankind, involving all aspects of the life of governments, regions, institutions and cities, in the name of the fight against climate change. This indeed is the first significant step in a long journey ahead.
Next week, in fact, the new International Climate Conference - COP22 - will open in Marrakesh, an engagement that the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in a statement called "a new beginning." "Within 15 years," it explained, "an unprecedented reduction in emissions will need to be reached, along with a joint effort to build cities that can withstand the impact of climate change. Indeed the excessively high levels of emissions will be one of the main themes of the Marrakesh encounter."
The World Meteorological Organization has confirmed that, for the first time in 2015, the concentration of carbon dioxide emissions has reached the level of 400 parts per million. And in 2016 it is likely to reach new highs. As the UNFCCC stressed, “this means that the world is still far from achieving the first of the Paris Agreement's objectives: limit global warming to well below 2°C, keeping it as close as possible to 1.5°C, in order to prevent disastrous events of which we could not calculate the consequences."
According to the the agreement envisaged in Paris, by 2018 the single States should have developed regulations capable of managing and rendering measurable their actions carried out in favour of the climate, so as to ensure transparency on all sides. This result should be accompanied by a flow of 100 billion dollars in support of environmental protection. The meeting at Marrakesh will continue to pursue this goal.