A discovery from 1800 promises changes in the world of transportation

A discovery from 1800 promises changes in the world of transportation

Editorial Staff
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The so-called "Seebeck effect" stores energy produced from heat coming from engines and car and truck exhausts to recharge them with up to 30% energy

A 200 year old discovery could revolutionize the transportation world, allowing for the storage of heat produced by engines and converting it to energy to power cars and trucks. Engineers from Scania, a truck company, in collaboration with researchers from the Sweden KTH Royal Institute of Technology, have in fact taken advantage of what is known as the Seebeck Effect, with which in a circuit made up of metal conductors or semiconductors, a temperature shift generates electricity: a phenomenon discovered in 1821 by German physicist Thomas Johann Seebeck. According to researchers, the generated energy could power a vehicle of average engine size. Specifically, from a truck engine which generates 440 kW of power, it is possible to generate another 132 kW, recovering the heat which would otherwise be dispersed. But this is not all, since, within the Seebeck effect, the difference in temperature has to be very high, according to Swedish engineers this discovery could be even more useful in marine engines, with which cooling the engine is easier.