The UK's post-Brexit environmental commitment threatens to derail

The UK's post-Brexit environmental commitment threatens to derail

Elisa Maria Giannetto
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A leak reveals how Theresa May and Donald Trump's policies have much in common

Never leave personal items unattended on a train, especially if they are confidential British government documents, that were carelessly left by a government official and exposed to the passengers' curiosity, who missed no time in photographing them and subsequently putting them up on the web. The result is that today we know that post-Brexit UK, that has pledged to get rid of the snares set by tyrannical Brussels' bureaucrats, intends slackening its commitment to combat climate change and the illegal trade in animals. A move, that of Prime Minister May, which to some degree echoes the efforts of her American counterpart who, not satisfied in having defined climate change as ''a hoax'', has committed himself heart and soul to dismantling the work of the Environmental Protection Agency. According to observers May’s move should help develop bilateral trade agreements between the United Kingdom and several African and South American countries, in what, citing the incriminating documents, should represent the evolution towards the status of a ''great nation of global trade''. Concern has particularly been expressed by the political and social anti-Brexit sphere, worried about the excessive power the current government will have when it will be free to choose which of the thousands of European laws and regulations it will retain in its system. And once again, Theresa May's fiercest adversary is likely to be Gina Miller. The businesswoman, whose successful appeal to the UK Supreme Court forced the government to submit Brexit to a difficult parliamentary procedure, is already preparing a new appeal in case the government proceeds by decree in formalizing the political changes sketched out in the hitherto reserved document. Who seems to have missed the train to a measure that would bring benefits to the environment and to his country’s budget is Donald Trump, whose team had for a short time dallied with the idea of ​​a carbon tax, the Republican Party having the primary objective of finding a way of financing the monumental tax cuts that the president repeatedly promised during his election campaign. The tax on carbon emissions, particularly appreciated by the Democrats, has found some unexpected supporters on the Republican side, such as former Secretaries of State George Shultz and James Baker, as well as former US Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson. However, a bare statement from spokeswoman Lindsay Walters has made the prospect appear more remote, as well as also excluding the idea of ​​a tax similar to our VAT. The Trump administration though still needs to ensure the coverage for the tax cuts. Washington states that the carbon tax is still on track, and may coming on the next train.