The Usa's "Green Map" is Expanding

The Usa's "Green Map" is Expanding

Elisa Maria Giannetto
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The total number of US cities engaged in the transition towards the zero emissions target is now up to 25. While in France a call for tender for the development of two tidal current power plants has been issued

Two new green pins have been added to the geolocation of 100% green US cities. Thanks to the start of the transition to clean energy in Madison, Wisconsin, and Abita Springs, Louisiana, the total number of US areas engaged in the ambitious goal of attaining zero emissions is now up to 25. The decision, passed unanimously by the respective municipal councils, assigns these locations the role of trailblazers in their states in a process that, in a few years, should lead to an economy powered entirely from renewable sources. ''A historic commitment'' - is what Madison alderman Alder Zach Wood called it, who emphasized the many benefits of this choice: ''The 100% green goal will drive an economy that will be able create more jobs locally, provide electricity at affordable and sustainable prices and offer cleaner air and water''. While Greg Lemons, Republican mayor of Abita Springs, highlighted that "politics has nothing to do with it. Clean energy is just a matter of good economic sense." What emerges from these comments is the bipartisan support for alternative energy development. But not only that. On a global level more and more areas are going green and evaluating new technologies that will allow them to become energetically self-sufficient and to near zero pollutant discharges into the atmosphere. France, for example, is experimenting with some of the first tidal current power plants (that use blades positioned on the seabed) and recently announced the call for tender for two tidal current power plants in two stretches of sea off the Normandy and Brittany coastline. Ségolène Royal, the French environment minister, explained that ''the prefects are defining the sites, subsequent to which negotiations with the interested companies will be started up, according to the principle of so-called competitive dialogue''.